network learning cities

TIMN “According to my review of history and theory, four forms of organization — and evidently only four — lie behind the governance and evolution of all societies across the ages: The tribal form was the first to emerge and mature, beginning thousands of years ago. Its main dynamic is kinship, which gives people a…

cities as learning platforms

In 2008, CEO’s for Cities recommended a more inclusive way of supporting learning in the community. Basically, the city becomes the learning platform, not just for schooling but for other community support activities, such as policing and heath care. “The current offer is that education is schooling — a special activity that takes place in…

friday’s finds #300

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. My initial post in this series was made in May 2009. The first three years of these posts were weekly. This is the 300th post of my Friday’s Finds. @SebPaquet: “Any sufficiently advanced work is indistinguishable from play.” Warren…

beta conversation 2017-06-15

I will be hosting the next Beta Conversation on Thursday, June 15th at 14:00 UTC [07:00 Pacific, 10:00 Eastern, 15:00 BST, 16:00 CET]. The subject will be Personal Knowledge Mastery (PKM) and leadership. The Harvard Business Review article, The Best Leaders are Constant Learners, gives a general idea of the themes to be discussed. Participants…

organizing for the network era

In my last post I noted that many organizations today are nothing more than attractive prisons. The current organizational tyranny was a response to a linear, print-based world. These organizations are artifacts of a time when information was scarce and hard to share, and when connections with others were difficult to make and required command…

attractive prisons

Today we hear a lot about models like holacracy and teal organizations that are focused on changing how we work together in organizations. Teal organization: A new kind of organization designed to enable “whole” individuals (not narrow professional selves) to self-organize and self-manage to achieve an organic organizational purpose (determined not through hierarchical planning but…

the world needs knowledge catalysts

“We live in a society absolutely dependent on science and technology and yet have cleverly arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. That’s a clear prescription for disaster.” —Carl Sagan When people are presented with a problem the first urge is to resolve it. If the computer does not work, they…

understanding work

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. @DonaldHTaylor: ‘In Turkish you never ask “Did you understand me?” It’s rather rude. Instead, you say “Anlatabildim mi?” – Was I able to explain?’ @suitpossum: “The world is not data. The world is soil,…

life in the jungle

How can you survive in the jungle when you live in a zoo? “Our silos (I won’t even mention cubicles!), like the cages in the zoo, exist to control behaviour and reduce complexity by creating homogeneity and closed environments. OD & HR professionals spend an inordinate amount of time trying to find new and better…

future hedging

“The future of work will be based on hacking uncertainty and hedging risks through post-blockchain smart contracts, learning and social capital. The main question is perhaps not what skills we should have in the future, but how we hedge the risks that are inbuilt in our world, our unique knowledge assets, the know-what, the know-who…